Saturday, October 25, 2014


Locker Room

RoundKick Rumble XXI, the science of eight limbs

11/20/2013

Pete Peterson’s last fight was more than two years ago, where he pummeled his opponent. That knee, along with the one immediately following it, knocked him out 46 seconds in the first round.

Pete Peterson’s last fight was more than two years ago, where he pummeled his opponent. That knee, along with the one immediately following it, knocked him out 46 seconds in the first round.

There is something wildly fascinating about watching two people fight. A slow temper building up to the point where civilized conversation no longer resonates effective to the parties involved, yet neither is willing to yield. A physical lashing becomes the only resolve. Hell, there isn’t a man — or woman, for that matter — out there hasn’t uttered the phrase, “I’d kinda like to get in a fight… I just want to see how I’d do.”

For those who didn’t get their vicarious fill from last week’s boxing match, another fighting event offers one more fix before the holidays.

“Muay Thai originates from Thailand and is referred to as the ‘science of eight limbs,’ ” said Pete “The Python” Peterson, organizer and participant of RoundKick Rumble XXI. “These fights are full contact. (Fighters) are going for the KO victory.”

Many may be unfamiliar with the Muay Thai fighting style, so this event is a perfect introduction. It’s called the “science of eight limbs,” because fighters use their fists, elbows, knees and feet in combination to score or knock out the opponent. This is a sport that never lets up and, in many ways, prepares fighters for situations that are unpredictable.

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“Each (fighter) has their own skill set strength, and I think we will see some variety,” Peterson said. “Within the rules set, you will see some fighters who like to stay on the outside and kick and stick-n-move, where as others will want to box more, while some will get in tight, clinch and throw more knees and elbows.”

This is a bittersweet event for Peterson personally, as it marks his final fight in the ring. After originally retiring in 2001 following a win at the U.S. PKL Pro Kickboxing Title. He moved to Iowa and opened up Roundkick Gym in Carroll. But the call to fight was too much to ignore, and Peterson returned to the ring in 2005 to win in a unanimous decision after five rounds. Unfortunately, Peterson was plagued by injuries, and recovery time took longer the older he got. It was time to consider retirement again.

“I’m old,” Peterson said. “At 46 I honestly feel 26 with regards to my conditioning and cardio and even strength and stamina. But it’s the abuse my body has taken over the years. Any injury I get seems to take forever to heal.”

While he may be getting older, Peterson — like many proficient in the Muay Thai fighting style — has learned to push his limits physically and challenge his strength mentally. He’ll be up against a better fighter — on paper — but that’s never concerned him before. This is his retirement fight, and he is looking to go out on a high note.

“Muay Thai is a powerful contact sport that is very exciting to watch,” Peterson said, noting the family atmosphere of the fight. “Everyone who has attended one of our events (whom had not done so previously) always comes away a new fan of Muay Thai and anxious for the next one.” CV

David Rowley is an Iowa native with a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Iowa and a master’s in film journalism from the University of Glasgow in Scotland.

 

RoundKick Rumble XXI
WHERE: Holiday Inn Airport/Conference Center, 6111 Fleur Drive
WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 23; doors open at 2 p.m., fights start at 3 p.m., pro fights at 8 p.m. plus more than 20 amateur and professional fights for a full day of action.
PRICE: $25-$30; reserved ringside tables, $320 (seats eight), add $40 for a total of 10 seats.
Not able to make it? Catch the fights on Livestream, $12.99, http://parkway.tv/live.

 

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