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Oct 13 , 2011
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By Matthew Scott Hunter

‘Spider-Man: Edge of Time

(T)

**

Activision

Xbox 360

Last year, developer Beenox brought us “Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions,” a game featuring four versions of the amazing web-slinger, each with his own distinctive art style and move set. This spiritual sequel scales back the number of Spider-Men to two, the art styles to one and the move sets to .75. Gone are the innovations from the previous game, like POV boss battles. Instead we get a game that plays very much like 2004’s “Spider-Man 2” video game. In other words, your spidey sense should be telling you to get ready for some button mashing.

The plot is promising enough. The head of an evil corporation called Alchemax travels back in time from the year 2099 to give his company a head start in the 1970s. So it’s up to the quip-spewing Spidey from our modern era and his no-nonsense, similarly dressed heir from 2099 to restore the timeline to the one we’re all familiar with (where lots of evil corporations rule the world, instead of just one). You’ll alternate between controlling the present and future Spider-Man (not that they control much differently) and pummel lots of similar looking minions. The narrative’s cleverest idea is, sadly, underutilized. Actions in the past can affect things in the future, so if future-Spidey’s having trouble with a giant killer robot, present-Spidey can put a quick end to the conflict by putting the mechanical man out of commission in his own era. Unfortunately, these temporal intersections are few and entirely scripted.

It would’ve been nice if there were many things you could do in the past—both deliberately and accidentally—that would affect the future. But that’s not the case, so just rest assured that if your future self could visit you, he’d warn you not to waste your time with this game.

‘Resident Evil: Code Veronica X HD’

(M)

**

Capcom

Xbox 360

“Resident Evil 4” was a gift to the franchise’s future and a curse to its past. Even with a high-definition makeover, “Veronica” is showing her age. Gamecube’s remake of the original “Resident Evil” looked better than this. This game should only be played by nostalgia gluttons or series fans curious about the chapter of the Umbrella corporation’s increasingly convoluted history that they’re most likely to have missed. But both groups should be warned: the infamous “tank-like” controls are even worse than you remember or have heard. And the equally notorious load screens that play every time you open a door are downright laughable.

‘Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 2 – Innocent Sin’

(T)

**1/2

Atlus

PlayStation Portable

After crawling through countless dungeons in service of clichéd fantasy tales, RPG fans might find the contemporary high school setting and bizarre story of this belated Japanese import a welcome change of pace. Among the odder attributes in “Persona 2,” demons are summoned with cell phones, attacking enemies can be convinced to walk away and if you need a particular weapon, you simply need to start a rumor that it exists, spread the rumor, and then wait for the rumor come true. Unfortunately, once the charm fades from these strange gimmicks, you’re left with tedious random encounters and graphics that were dated even when the Japanese played this game 10 years ago. CV



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